this is your brain on dance

Scientific American’s 2008 article explains that “unconscious entrainment – the process that causes us to absent-mindedly tap our feet to a beat – reflects our instinct for dance.” It would seem that our brains have evolved around rhythm!

Throughout all of the movement tasks in their study, there was activation in areas of the brain that correlate with Broca’s area, the area of the brain associated with speech production. These findings offer further support that dance began as a form of representational communication. Movement is a powerful impulse and a powerful form of expression.

Martha Graham said it best, “The body says what words cannot.”

What happened to dance? Unfortunately, society has taught many of us to become bashful, introverted and inhibited in using our bodies as a means of expression. Unfortunate, since we hold some of our most powerful and traumatic emotions and experiences on a cellular level. Without moving our bodies, it becomes very difficult to discharge what we need to in order to fully process our experiences.

When animals are faced with potential danger, they have a stress response of fight-or-flight-or-freeze. After freezing, and all danger is gone, these animals shiver in order to “shake off” the freeze response, to release the trauma and reset their bodies.

When humans are faced with potential danger, sympathetic nervous system arousal suppresses parasympathetic nervous system processes and trauma and experiences become stuck in our bodies. In extreme cases, this can lead to things like post-traumatic stress disorder and panic disorder.

Rooted in the idea that the mind and body are inseparable, dance movement therapy has been used as a way to treat trauma by allowing the processing of experiences to occur with visual and sensory memories. Sometimes there are no words. And sometimes the words feel unspeakable. Movement allows for this critical processing to occur in a safe space with some distance from intense emotions.

Not everything is trauma. Sometimes our bodies just feel tight and the more we stress, we begin to notice things like our shoulders creeping up to our ears (I call this New York City shoulders). Think about shaking it off, moving your body, stretching your body and releasing whatever emotions are stored up.

So, the next time you hit the dance floor, shake it in your bedroom, or simply find your foot tapping to the rhythm in the air, notice how you feel. Notice which emotions arise and how it feels in your body. Notice the energy that you release in your movements and how you feel when you’re done. Connect to yourself, mind and body, and shake it like you mean it! Move as if no one is watching!

Advertisements

About Jodi Rubin, ACSW, LCSW, CEDS

Jodi graduated with a B.A. in Psychology from SUNY at New Paltz and earned her Master’s degree in Social Work from New York University. In addition to over a decade of work as an LCSW and Certified Eating Disorder Specialist with individuals, families and groups in her private practice, Jodi is a NASM (National Academy of Sports Medicine) Certified Personal Trainer and created Destructively Fit®, a training that addresses eating disorders within the fitness industry. She is a former director of Day Treatment at The Renfrew Center for Eating Disorders and a founding member of Metropolitan Psychotherapy and Family Counseling Practice. Jodi also specializes in infertility and has served on the Clinical Advisory Board of Seleni Institute since its inception. Jodi is the creator of a curriculum on eating disorders for the Graduate School of Social Work at New York University and has been teaching this course, as well as guest lecturing in the NYU Post-Master’s Program, since 2007. Jodi actively lectures and teaches students, families and professionals throughout the metropolitan area about the etiology, prevention, treatment, assessment and work with eating disorders. Through psychotherapy and supportive work with adolescents, adults and families, Jodi works to create a secure sense of self, increased self-esteem and a healthy relationship with self and others. She works with an eclectic person-centered approach and tailors her practice techniques to the unique needs of each individual. Please feel free to contact Jodi directly in her Greenwich Village office, 212.529.5811. View all posts by Jodi Rubin, ACSW, LCSW, CEDS

One response to “this is your brain on dance

Leave a Reply

Fill in your details below or click an icon to log in:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out / Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out / Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out / Change )

Google+ photo

You are commenting using your Google+ account. Log Out / Change )

Connecting to %s

%d bloggers like this: